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Monochrome Group


The group is not run as a club. These are meetings of like minded photographers discussing and enjoying monochrome photography, either digital prints or traditional darkroom prints. Will colleagues who attend please bring some of their monochrome prints to show.

For most of history, black and white photography was a photographer’s only choice for taking pictures. Even when colour became available, black and white photos were initially of better quality and less expensive to develop than their colour counterparts.

As its quality improved, colour film became a more popular choice for photographs, causing black and white photography to decline in popularity.

However, at present, black and white photos are enjoying a revival. Photographers are rediscovering the power and timeless nature that black and white can lend to photos.

 

The LPA  Monochrome group meet at Nettleham Village Hall (LN2 2SS) on the first Sunday of each month.

The Meetings start at 10.00am with tea/coffee and biscuits. At 10.30am the speaker starts their presentation and we break for lunch at 12.15 until 1.45pm . In the afternoon session colleagues show their work .. either prints or digital files, but only monochrome.

The cost of this great day out is only £6.

If anyone would like more information, please get in touch with me on  marty4united@msn.com.

 

Next Meeting:   Sunday June 4th David Lowe
 


Why Take Black and White Photos?

With the vibrant colours available in modern film and with digital cameras, why opt for black and white photos at all? Depending on the subject, a photographer may use black and white film to create a stark, somber tone for his photos. This quality has paved the way for black and white photography in photojournalism.

The vibrancy of colour can, at times, actually detract from the desired photographic effect. Subtle effects of texture and lighting that can be lost in colour photographs, will stand out in black and white photography.

 

Black and white photos can add an air of romance, class, timelessness and mystery to otherwise ordinary photographs. A run-of-the-mill colour photo may look entirely different when seen in black and white. For this reason, both wedding and gothic photography have embraced the timeless quality of black and white photos.